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Six Potential HIPAA Threats for PHOs and Super Groups

Six Potential HIPAA Threats for PHOs and Super Groups

Physician Hospital Organizations (PHOs) and super groups are on the rise. About 40 percent of physicians either work for a hospital or a practice group owned by a hospital, or they ban together to form a super group. Individual practices share operations, billing, and other administrative functions, gain leverage with insurance companies, add specialist resources and increase referrals, improve patient outcomes with a cohesive care plan, and more. The benefits are plentiful.

But just like a negative restaurant review on Yelp can hurt customer patronage and the restaurant's reputation, one practice that commits a HIPAA violation can affect the entire group, and result in an expensive fine, cause distrust among patients, and in extreme cases, the data breach can lead to medical identity theft.

For PHOs and super groups, adherence to HIPAA rules becomes more complicated when compliance isn't consistent among the group's practices, and a compliance officer isn't on board to manage risks and respond to violations.

At a minimum, the group should identify the potential sources for exposure of electronic protected health information (ePHI) and take measures to avert them. For example:

Super groups include smaller practices that struggle with HIPAA compliance and associated time and costs. Although PHOs or super groups may be abundant in physicians, employees, and offices, these assets could come from a majority of smaller organizations. Historically smaller practices struggle with resources to comply with HIPAA and hiring expensive compliance consultants could be prohibitive at the individual practice level.

Each practice uses a different EHR, or the EHR is centralized but the ePHI is stored on different devices. It becomes difficult to assess HIPAA compliance as well as how patient data is being protected when there are various EHRs implemented across multiple practices. Some EHRs may be cloud based while other systems reside in an individual practice's office. Getting an accurate inventory of where ePHI is stored or accessed can be challenging.

Hospitals can't conduct thorough security risk assessments for each practice in the group. A PHO could have 20 or more individual practices and the time required to perform individual security risk assessments could be daunting. These risk assessments are labor intensive and could strain the resources of hospital compliance staff.

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