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Your Cyber-Risk Policy: What it Covers and What it Doesn't

Your Cyber-Risk Policy: What it Covers and What it Doesn't

In healthcare, we deal with highly sensitive and very private electronic information, so of course our ears perk up every time we see headlines about the latest cyber threat or breach. The natural question is whether this could happen to us. This is constructive if it leads to cyber risk-prevention. But all too often, folks are responding with, "it could not happen to me," or "my insurance policy covers this so I'm prepared." These folks are ignoring the growing cyber threat around all of us. They are whistling past the "cyber" graveyard.

We live in a digital age where almost everything is accessible — even more now with the evolution of EHRs — so we have to run our businesses as though we are all at risk. To be prepared, we must first understand the common sources of cyber risk. Second, we must understand the basics of cyber insurance policies we may or may not have in place.

There are several ways breaches at small healthcare organizations may occur:

1. Disgruntled employees are one of the leading reasons for cyber attacks. They know your systems — likely better than you do — so keep a close watch on them and what type of data they have access to. Really pay close attention to new staff and those that may be on their way out. Also make sure they know they are monitored.

2. Cyber criminals are looking for remote Internet access services with weak passwords. Require and enforce more complex passwords and require employees to change their passwords regularly.

A smart form of cyber protection is a cyber-risk insurance policy. These provide bundled services designed to help you quickly respond to a data breach. However, there are many cyber insurance product options to consider. These range from standalone policies with high limits and comprehensive services to policy add-on coverages typically offering less coverage.

Rather than stumbling through a maze of complicated cyber-related insurance rhetoric, do yourself a favor and review your options with an experienced broker:

• Carefully scrutinize "free" cyber coverage or riders added onto your base coverage. While not totally worthless, the majority come nowhere near covering the exposure of a potential cyber breach (which explains why they are typically thrown in at no additional cost). In reviewing your insurance coverages with your broker, it's easy to brush by this one and mentally check off the fact that you have cyber coverage. Drill into the details of what's covered, as outlined below.

• Find out how much you are covered for and what out-of-pocket expenses you could expect. A data breach at a small physician practice could run into the hundreds of thousands of dollars or even higher. This type of uncovered damage could put a small practice out of business. Some expenses physicians can expect to incur when a breach occurs include legal fees, IT forensic costs, notification costs, credit monitoring costs, and public relations and advertising expenses to reclaim patient goodwill as well as making the public aware of the steps taken to address the breach.

Cyber risk is not just a technology issue. It affects all elements of the healthcare business and needs to be well-planned and mitigated through ongoing education and risk-management programs.

 
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