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Preparing the Nonclinical, Non-Coder for ICD-10

Preparing the Nonclinical, Non-Coder for ICD-10

As the U.S. healthcare system moves closer to the Oct. 1, 2015, ICD-10 implementation deadline, clinicians and coders continue preparing for this immense change in healthcare reimbursement and clinical documentation practices. While medical office operations and management continue to focus on ICD-10 education, it's important to determine the appropriate education levels of non-coding, nonclinical staff needed for ICD-10 education. Determining the details in ICD-10 education is an important consideration that an astute leader will want to eagerly identify according to their practice needs.

A practice leader's focus on educating the nonclinical, non-coding staff might include reviewing the following positions: scheduling, registration, accounts payable and accounts receivable, laboratory, revenue cycle specialists, and file clerks. For the ICD-10 transition to flow as smoothly as possible, it is imperative that all staff have knowledge of the new coding system and understand how it will impact their current positions.

In order to determine the correct level of education, analyzing current job positions should commence. This includes the review of policies and procedures, specific job aides and toolkits, work flow, and finally, transparent communication with the team. Furthermore, the revenue cycle process should be reviewed to ensure all staff with revenue cycle interactions are appropriately educated in ICD-10.

Here are some suggested processes a practice leader may follow in order to establish appropriate training in ICD-10 according to job position, including giving a brief refresher on the revenue cycle processes, and common positions that normally interact with the cycle and its specific stage. While every effort is made to cover all non-coding, nonclinical staff, it is up to the practice leader to review all positions and determine the best way to proceed with ICD-10 education for their team.

Revenue Cycle

A healthy revenue cycle is a key to a successful physician practice. A practice leader should review his current revenue cycle processes and take into consideration where the individual practice's revenue cycle starts and stops, as well as determine each staff position's interaction with the cycle.

Before education can be delivered, and staff positions are analyzed, it is crucial to remember the flow of the revenue cycle from the initial intake of patient information to zeroing out the balance in the patient's account. This will ensure a successful ICD-10 training for practice staff.

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