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7 Takeaways from Real-Life Malpractice Cases

7 Takeaways from Real-Life Malpractice Cases

  • ©Lightspring/Shutterstock.com
    ©Lightspring/Shutterstock.com

Incidents related to malpractice not only severely alter the patient's quality of care and even their life, but can also lead to detrimental consequences for the physicians involved. From significant financial settlements to the loss of reputation and even licensure, the devastating effects of malpractice can spread to others in a practice or other healthcare setting. 

Malpractice suits can also serve as invaluable educational tools for practices. Between being honest about mistakes to respecting your professional limitations, here are seven key takeaways from real-life malpractice horror stories.  

Steph Weber is a freelance writer hailing from the Midwest. She writes about healthcare and small business, but finds her passion for the medical field growing in sync with the ever-changing healthcare laws.

Source: 
Physicians Practice

Comments

Conflict Management Care observations & recommendations

Call in the Consult - this could reveal different problems but one definitely shows, intentional or not, a lack of social awareness (the pain of the patient), empathy (caring deeply enough to help him get at bare minimum, protective care). It reveals being distracted when this was an emergency issue. So motivation was low.

Be Honest About Mistakes - attorneys, hospitals and doctors fear financial "attacks" and emotional, financial and career pain. Yet honesty is character and shaded truth or dishonesty is also (poor) character and bad business. It shows no respect and is insulting. Hospitals, attorneys and doctors don't like being insulted or to be misled. Patients need that same empathy and self control from you.

Communicate to Improve Care - this is simply setting a high standard, coaching competently and with excellence and making it all about the team's success. It can be done at a high level. Listen to complaints and learn and then focus on the team (communication).

Listen to the Expertise of Others - don't allow ego to cause other people pain. Ego also demoralizes others, contaminates teams and leads to high-level, costly conflict and at times, negative, painful outcomes. Again, this is low emotional intel. Leadership can't allow this to become the standard.

Know and Respect Your Limits - enthusiasm is a strength, self awareness, empathy and ego are not. Selfish is not a team value.

Michael Toebe
Conflict Management Care
http://www.conflictmanagementcare.com
Michael@ConflictManagementCare.com

Michael @

It's easy to share your victories in court, where all of the information is already available to the public. But only 5% of med mal cases go to trial, and the defense wins 80- 90% of those. The most egregious cases are settled before trial, in part to insert non-disclosure clauses that keep the mistakes out of the public eye.
If we truly want to improve patient safety, we will assure that the learnings from pre-trial settlements are made as public as the cases that go to trial. Mistakes are for learning, not repeating. (See "Medical Malpracitce Insights" https://madmimi.com/p/5f4487.) If aviation treated their mistakes like we in healthcare treat ours, no one would dare fly.

Charles @

"If we truly want to improve patient safety, we will assure that the learnings from pre-trial settlements are made as public as the cases that go to trial. Mistakes are for learning, not repeating."

Completely agree, Charles, on your wisdom.

Michael

Michael @

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