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The Top 10 Things Doctors Should Never Say to Patients

The Top 10 Things Doctors Should Never Say to Patients

Looking for more on boosting patient satisfaction and dealing with difficult patients? Join experts Rosemarie Nelson, Lucien W. Roberts, Elizabeth Woodcock, and others as they help improve your medical practice and your bottom line at Practice Rx, a new conference for physicians and office administrators. Join us May 2 & 3 in Newport Beach, Calif.

Physicians Practice asked the experts: What are the top 10 things physicians should never say to patients? Here's what they told us.

 

Source: 
Physicians Practice

Comments

Unable to scroll through slides?

Barb @

I apologize for all the comments you are receiving from physicians on your ideas. This is a difficult time for physicians as government , corporate and computer forces impair the ability to function.
I am trying to capture the information to share with my next county medical society meeting. I will likely be attacked for presenting it. I wlil bring a voodoo doll for the members to stick needles in,

Thank you for your efforts to help improve physician interaction. I imagine a lot of doors being kicked at your office.
Sincerely .,
Charles Lawson M.D.

Charles @

Dear Dr Lawson,

Thank you for your response and support. This is indeed a difficult time for physicians who are currently navigating a myriad of change. It is never easy, especially when so much is required at once, and it is not surprising that many may feel overwhelmed and unhappy.

While we cannot alter the current landscape or remove the pressures brought about by government and indeed, the public in general, we can offer techniques, resources and tools to make the transition a great deal easier and far more productive. I'm glad you have found the points raised in the post valuable, and I wish you every success at your upcoming meeting.

Please reach out if I can help you in any way.

Kind regards,

Sue Larsen
Astute Doctor Inc

Sue @

This format sucks. Please put future articles in a word (one page) format if you want physicians to read it. I was unable to get past the first slide. Out of frustration I give up. Please make this site user friendly. (fewer key strokes per word read) and printable without all the color.

David @

David:
Thanks for your feedback.

We have included a PDF of more recent slideshows for easier access by our audience.

Keith L. Martin
Physicians Practice

keithmartin @

as they say, think before you speak...

Nancy @

Thank you so much for this informative article. The points are very well taken.

James @

These are good points, but some times its difficult to do it. But will definitely keep in mind.

Bhubanesh @

I appreciate your sincere comment. In response, let me say that your are correct...I am not a physician. I work with the "business" side of medicine. I've spent the last 30 years working with healthcare administrators, physicians, risk managers, and various other "vendor types" on the business side of healthcare.

I have very often been there when a client physician has faced the very traumatic experience of dealing with a malpractice allegation. I respect and admire what physicians do in today's challenging healthcare environment. Practicing medicine has never been more challenging.

Let me clarify what we wanted to do with this article. What we are finding is that even the best physicians can forget life lessons they’ve known for years during a very busy day. Keep in mind these comments are all based on research – it is what is actually happening in offices – and what then comes up in court cases. So our sharing is nothing more than that – so other physicians can be reminded about where the potential problem areas may be – what they need to monitor and address. I understand your anger and frustration at the challenges you must face today. The advice below is all free – and we believe it is useful for physicians.

My best to you. Thanks for what you do for your patients.

-Jeff Brunken

Jeff @

Most of us as physicians especially after several years work experience are more than aware of most of these communication points. Whoever came up with these COMMUNICATION POINTS DO NOT CARE FOR PATIENTS AS A PHYSICIANS AND DO NOT TAKE INTO ACCOUNT THE UNIMAGINABLE TIME RESTRAINTS --- GIVE US ENOUGH TIME AND MOST OF US CAN EASILY HAVE MOST OF OUR PATIENTS IN LOVE WITH US---BUT HEY ---WE AINT GOT THE TIME--IT AINT THERE --SO THE TIMELY HAND HOLDING AND FLOWERY SPEECHES ARE USUALLY HARD TO COME BY- WE KNOW IT BUT WE NO LONGER HAVE THE POWER AND CONTROL. WE ARE MORE AND MORE TIME SQUEEZED , LESS COMPENSATED WITH MORE AND MORE EXPERTS, COOPERATE AND GOVERNMENT BEAUROCRATS,NON PRACTICING FOR A LIVING FAKE PHYSICIANS, WHO CAN'T OR DON'T WANT TO TAKE ON THE RESPONSIBILITY AND POTENTIAL LIABILITY OF CARING FOR PATIENTS --TELLING US IN THE TRENCHES HOW TO DO IT BETTER WHILE SMILING IN OUR FACES WITH THEIR HANDS IN OUR POCKETS.

charles @

Really? My practice should hire communication expert, or better of an actor to speak with patients, so I can do my job.

Lary @

Why in the world did you present this in a slide show format? It is neither cute nor trendy. I suspect it is so you can put up more ads to catch the physician'sattention and this galls me!

There is absolutely no reason this couldn't be presented in a text form on one page. Skip the theatrics and present it so busy physicians can read it quickly.

ROGER @

I would just like to say that everything you said IS TRUE..... I work for a NP that bends over backwards for her patients spending hours with them explaining to them why she is ordering tests that she is ordering and then they get PO and run to the Nursing Board and make a complaint at which case the Nursing Board believes the patient and not the documentation that is right in front of their faces and then reprimands the NP for doing her job.......... I think that the Nursing Board is given way to much power and I feel that Who ever it is that oversees them needs to make some serious changes. She was not even aloud to plea her case or even speak on her behalf, and the last time that I looked at the laws in the United States that is a violation against the 5th amendment... Please correct me if I am wrong

Rochelle @

I wanted to add a few more points to Mr. Brunken’s. Physicians today are juggling enormous workloads and responsibilities, so the idea of having to be so careful about what and how they communicate with patients can seem a little unrealistic. It is important to note, however that while I am not a physician, all the points outlined in this article are based on real world situations and those that have become factors in actual malpractice suits. Furthermore, they have been drawn from published peer review papers and reflect the outcomes of research conducted by physicians. It’s important that MDs realize how very important communication can be. I welcome discussion and further outreach on this topic for those interested.

Sue @

Sue and I appreciate any and all comments about our opinion on the never say statements from physicians. Yes, I am not a physician and therefore don't know first-hand what happens in a physician office. However, I'm a veteran of the physician insurance marketplace. So, what I do know is what happens on the claims side. What we see in our business (for the past 45 years) is what leads to malpractice allegations. We all get busy, stressed, and rushed. Sometimes we says things we perhaps shouldn't. These things can matter later in the event of a malpractice claim.

I have the utmost respect for physicians. What you do is not easy. I only hope that this communication piece can help physicians who are already working hard to provide great patient care. What you say to patients does matter.

Jeff @

It would be really helpful if you didn't use the "slideshow of images" format and use a bulleted or numbered list instead....so we could print the list for colleague doctors and staff could easily read it, or it could be posted on a bulletin board.

Brenna @

Yes I agree I would like it in another format as well... Brenna you can copy and paste into a word document that is what I did

Rochelle @

Feroz:
To clarify, Physicians Practice does not pay for any content; sponsored content is clearly marked as such.
This slideshow, which has been very popular among our physician readers, serves as a reminder that sometimes a malpractice suit can be avoided simply by the things you say. If you have other tips, advice, etc., for our audience, I'd welcome your input as would our other readers.
Thank you.

Keith L. Martin
Group Editorial Director
Physicians Practice

keithmartin @

Comments on this article . . hmmmmmm
Really??!! Why would Physician practice even publish this . . did the authors pay you to print this . .

Feroz @

I don't think the author has any clue about reality of day to day doctor's life.

Alaleh @

Are you a doctor?? Do you work in a doctors office just curious

Rochelle @

Well said, and all true. Interesting to note that these are also the things doctors should never say to their staff, if they want a high-performing office. Patients and staff physicians are all people. They will respond similarly to similar treatment. Carol Stryker, Symbiotic Solutions

Carol @

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