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2016 Healthcare Trends: Certified PAs Make a Difference

2016 Healthcare Trends: Certified PAs Make a Difference

Healthcare is ever-changing, influenced by patients, providers, and payers. Certified PAs can help busy physicians manage important healthcare trends.

Now more than ever providers are charged not only with patient-centered care but also with patient satisfaction and engagement. Certified PAs can increase patient satisfaction and engagement through education and counseling of patients and families, follow-up to ensure compliance, and coordinating care.

To download a PDF of this presentation click here.

Source: 
Physicians Practice

Comments

I find it interesting that the people who responded negatively to this PA article have missed the point. Danzinger seems conflicted. S/he says PAs are great, but then elaborates on what he sees as bad PA practice. PAs have ALWAYS been trained to be vital members of a healthcare team. Other practitioners have more recently begun to catch up on this team concept. As a hospital-based PA, I talk with everyone on the team : Patient, family, doctors, PAs, NPs, nurses, PT, OT, Case manager, Soc Worker, etc. I don't pretend to know it all. If you take the time to collaborate, there is always someone who adds info that I didn't know. Do some PAs do more than they should? I'm sure some do, but it is a sm minority. Danzinger seems upset that a PA had the nerve to question his Dx on a patient. As a member of the team, I feel free to speak up for the patient if I see the care could improve. The doctors (most of them) I work with appreciate and respect my opinion. In a culture of safety, everyone should feel free to speak up, and the physician should not feel challenged or argued with. Try to remember it is about the patient.
Yanira is concerned about an increase in malpractice cases. Please consult the literature. The evidence completely contradicts this myth.
Carol is the one who perplexes me. She seems very concerned about where the money is going. Perhaps she would improve her care if she was more worried about the things that really matter. Healthcare is more patient-centered now. PAs increase the patient's access to care, and decreases total healthcare cost. Many studies show that the care of PAs (and NPs) is at least as good as that of a physician so they do all this without a loss of quality. And by the way Carol, the patient is not billed the same. When you bill under the PAs name, you get reimbursed at 80% of what the doctor would get. You may argue you think this percentage is too high if you like, but please don't argue that it is the same.

Christine @

Christine - Please read my comments again - My concern is not where the money is going but that the patient is being charged for a physician when they have seen a PA. I don't know what state you are in or who is filing your claims, but claims in my state are not reduced to 80%. As an example, contracted rates with BCBS is $176 for under 15 min. whether provided by an MD or PA . The cost to the patient is not reduced - that is my issue.

Carol @

You must be supported by PA organizations because you always try to say how wonderful they are.

And they are great, when they work within their training. So often, they go way beyond their experience and because they do so, the advice and care to patients is often very poor and often totally inaccurate. Medicine is a very specialized service dependent on in-depth training.

When the PA performs in accord with their background, they are an important part of the health care team but they must be aware of their limitations and ask a doctor for help. They may not even know what they don't know, and this is a serious problem.

It would be a good service to your readers to inform them of what the PA's job should be and where they need assistance. I have many issues with PAs and about care of patients; some will argue with me over diagnosis and care even though their information and judgment are not accurate.

I have worked with many well-trained and caring PAs and value their contribution but there is a difference between them and a physician and this is not bad, it is just different, and should be acknowledged by all parties.

I have previously contacted you but you never responded.

If you want to offer impartial journalism, and keep readers, present the positive and negative and don't favor your apparent sponsors.

Danziger @

I wholeheartedly agree with the Danziger statement above. PA's or NP's do not have the same training that physicians undergo. It is unrealistic to expect them to have the same scope of understanding or judgment that a physician has when treating medical conditions.
Although a valuable part of the healthcare system. Some of the trends of replacing physicians with NP's or PA's overtime will prove an increase in malpractice cases. I believe that patients are aware of the difference but often times have no choice in whom they are allowed to see when they come into a clinical setting that is large. I have many patients who switched to my practice with a complaint that they are not allowed to see a physician and are forced to see either an NPor PA.

Yanira @

I wholeheartedly agree with the Danziger statement above. PA's or NP's do not have the same training that physicians undergo. It is unrealistic to expect them to have the same scope of understanding or judgment that a physician has when treating medical conditions.
Although a valuable part of the healthcare system. Some of the trends of replacing physicians with NP's or PA's overtime will prove an increase in malpractice cases. I believe that patients are aware of the difference but often times have no choice in whom they are allowed to see when they come into a clinical setting that is large. I have many patients who switched to my practice with a complaint that they are not allowed to see a physician and are forced to see either an NPor PA.

Yanira @

I totally agree with both of you. I feel it is also important to mention the impact on the patient. The tag line for this article was "How PA's put money in your pocket". The money is from the patient - they are charged the same fee as if they had seen a doctor. Why isn't anyone outraged about this and why are the Insurance Companies going along with it. Sounds kind of like paying for a Lexus and receiving a Volkswagon. If a PA is qualified to diagnose a patient and prescribe medication after two years of education and a internship, why do require Physicians to attend 6 plus years before they can practice on their own. The whole concept is ludicrous - solely about money with no consideration for the patient.

Carol @

First of all VW and Lexus is a very terrible analogy. Smh

Christine @

Christine - What analogy would you use for the cost of services.

Carol @

Hello, I am a sponsor and would like to not hear such over generalizations from the above respondents - these respondents generalizations are harmful, are irresponsible and I beg to differ.

To Danzinger and the following respondents: All of what what written and responded to, above, could be said for ANY provider and practitioner, (as well as office staff and administrators, for that matter). ALL Providers or Practitioners (docs, PAs NPs, etc) are fallible... and "the poorer ones will go "way beyond" their experience and because they do so and care to patients is often very poor and often totally inaccurate. Medicine is a very specialized service dependent on in-depth training"

PAs have highly standardized and indepth training... and to a very broad extent to are trained in this way to recognize, diagnose and treat disease processes in the clinical space. The intensive training is concentrated without the breaks and vacations regular medical school has. The number of hours are equal to 80-90% the hours in clinical training of that of a doctor and exceeds that of an NP. PAs are meant to be clinicians and not trained as scientists. These are the extra hours a medical student's training is in. This is why PAs are useful in society. PA's are prepared to be able to be efficiently available to serve and help in our society's growing needs for disease prevention; often in underserved communities. As well, to diagnose and treat disease in highly specialized fields of medicine.

PAs are specifically trained to recognize when something is not normal and to further investigate and report this. Perhaps it is the organization itself, the office or health care system that over utilizes PAs and does not provide the proper environments for collaboration...it instead burdens the provider/PA with little back-up or access to each other for that needed collaborative moment when the PA may need that second pair of eyes. In general, these moments are often for the newly minted PA. Once the PA is in the same clinical space as the physician, they are practicing beside and collaborating with, the PA with his training in taking a thorough history and physical with very often a high-quality bedside manner often exceed patients expectations. Our society needs more than ever this service and there is room at the table for all expert clinicians. We will find bad-apples in all areas of the clinical space from the administrator to doctor. Please do not generalize - it is harmful and irresponsible to what is so needed for us all.

Christine @

Thank you Christine for you come back on the above comments. I have been a practicing PA for almost 18 years and have seen good and bad providers with every type of initials after their name. To generalize any one type of provider is narrow minded. Too many times I have been told by a patient that their previous MD/DO never examined them as thoroughly as I do or listened to them like I do. I am humbled that a patient will seek me out for a second opinion even after a specialist. You could say I'm the exception but I would beg to differ. I have met many physicians who look down their noses at PAs-they don't ruffle my feathers, I have gained the respect of many physicians in internal medicine and the specialties and many confer with me on their cases. The PA profession has been around a long time and there are many of us seasoned practicing providers-and the new grads are inspiring to follow our footsteps, that are all providing excellent care! And especially at a time when there is a marked decrease in graduating MDs, why would anyone not want to finally take a look at hiring a PA to join their practice?

Susan @

Christine, if you are a sponsor of this article, you didn't address the issue involving your own tag line regarding putting money in MD's pocket. What would happen if you advertised to patients - come see our PA's - we bill you the same as if you have seen a physician and our MD's will make more money.

Carol @

Danziger, your comments regarding PAs are obsurd, inaccurate, and misleading. PAs are well-trained and competent licensed medical professionals and you know it! I have been a nationally certified PA for almost 20 years and have met and worked with many competent PAs. I have also met and worked with many INCOMPETENT physicians. There is good and bad in every profession! Once a PA is practicing for a few years... most of our practice of medicine is indistinguishable from our physician colleagues. Our scope of practice is what it is today because we have earned it. Legislators and patients alike see our value-- and not just our economic value! We help fill the void that physicians have left.. especially in primary care. I own my own practice for many years and have saved many lives. I have improved the quality of life of thousands of patients and I truly resent your inaccurate/ bitter comments. PAs fight many battles daily...some battles that Physicians will never fight! Just because you may have had a negative interaction with one or two PAs does NOT mean we are all bad. If that were the case... I would NEVER agree to be treated by a Physician! None of us would! I have also met some incredible Physicians... whom I respect and appreciate. Some of them trained me over 20 years ago and I have passed their lessons on to others. I love what I do and I am damn good at it. I have been asked many times to take over the medical care of some parents of my Physician colleagues and I still care for them today. If you are going to speak about my profession... Please speak the truth! If you are that unhappy in your medical career...go do something else!

Christine @

It is unfortuntate that some of our physician colleagues choose to opine on a subject they do not fully understand. It reminds me of the poem "The Six Men of Indostan". As a PA who moved to Mississippi (the last state to license PAs) I have seen first hand the "I've never met a PA but I don't want to have anything to do with them" atttitude. It is also interesting to see attitudes change as new PAs come to the state and people realize the professionalism and quality of care that they bring. This argument about Physician Assistants and quality of care has been around since Dr. Stead first started the profession. But the data has consistently shown that PAs provide competent care at a lower cost. They generally bill at 80% unless a physician is directly involved in the care. Then they can bill "incident to the physician" at 100%.

Christine @

It is unfortuntate that some of our physician colleagues choose to opine on a subject they do not fully understand. It reminds me of the poem "The Six Men of Indostan". As a PA who moved to Mississippi (the last state to license PAs) I have seen first hand the "I've never met a PA but I don't want to have anything to do with them" atttitude. It is also interesting to see attitudes change as new PAs come to the state and people realize the professionalism and quality of care that they bring. This argument about Physician Assistants and quality of care has been around since Dr. Stead first started the profession. But the data has consistently shown that PAs provide competent care at a lower cost. They generally bill at 80% unless a physician is directly involved in the care. Then they can bill "incident to the physician" at 100%.

Christine @

It is unfortuntate that some of our physician colleagues choose to opine on a subject they do not fully understand. It reminds me of the poem "The Six Men of Indostan". As a PA who moved to Mississippi (the last state to license PAs) I have seen first hand the "I've never met a PA but I don't want to have anything to do with them" atttitude. It is also interesting to see attitudes change as new PAs come to the state and people realize the professionalism and quality of care that they bring. This argument about Physician Assistants and quality of care has been around since Dr. Stead first started the profession. But the data has consistently shown that PAs provide competent care at a lower cost. They generally bill at 80% unless a physician is directly involved in the care. Then they can bill "incident to the physician" at 100%.

Christine @

i fully agree with your opinion.

sundara @

i fully agree with your opinion.

sundara @

@Danzinger you are generalizing all PA's here. You obviously are a very narrow minded person. Most PA's do "work within their training"....there are always exceptions and scenarios to every position/profession. You can't generalize PA xmcare just because you may or may not of had a positive experience in the past with one or two PA's. I quite frankly am appalled you think that way. I have personal experience where physician's have given horrible care and it resulted in a bad outcome. You do not see me bashing those experience. Grow up danzinger and realize the bigger picture!!
Jon

Christine @

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