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Seven Social Skills They Don't Teach in Medical School

Seven Social Skills They Don't Teach in Medical School

  • Seven Social Skills They Don't Teach in Medical School
    ©Roman Motizov/Shutterstock.com
  • Strong social abilities are crucial for personal and professional success.
    Strong social abilities are crucial for personal and professional success. Patients, colleagues, and the medical community all benefit from a physician's ability to network and communicate with confidence. Moreover, mastering such skills enhances relationships, ultimately leading to increased career satisfaction and job security. / ©Bacho/Shutterstock.com
  • Socializing doesn't come naturally to everyone, though.
    Socializing doesn't come naturally to everyone, though. Many people, including highly skilled doctors, can become paralyzed by feelings of discomfort in everyday networking situations. While networking and teamwork are commonly referred to as "soft" skills, they can be some of the hardest to master. Here are seven ways you can polish your presence, both online and off. / ©Pressmaster/Shutterstock.com
  • 1. Create a top-notch cyber portfolio.
    1. Create a top-notch cyber portfolio. People form an impression of you and your practice the instant they land on your website, visit your practice's Facebook page, or check out your Twitter feed. Take control of your image by posting a professional headshot or a pleasing photograph of your building or reception area. If you have a slogan, tagline, or manifesto, use it consistently across all social media platforms. / ©megaflop/Shutterstock.com
  • 2. Graciously reach out to people on LinkedIn.
    2. Graciously reach out to people on LinkedIn. The days of connecting with complete strangers on professional networking sites are over. You stand a much better chance of connecting if you override the standard "I'd like to connect with you" and replace it with a one- or two-sentence note. Let the person you'd like to align with know where you met or heard about them and why you're interested in them and their work. / ©Pressmaster/Shutterstock.com
  • 3. Converse with ease at networking events.
    3. Converse with ease at networking events. You're not alone if you feel apprehensive about approaching people and striking up conversations at networking events. Preparation is the key to confidence. Find out in advance about the purpose of the occasion and who else will be in attendance. If there's a keynote speaker or guest of honor, take a few minutes to learn about who they are, what they specialize in, and where they're from. / ©Lightspring/Shutterstock.com
  • 4. Be a reliable teammate.
    4. Be a reliable teammate. Technology is quickly replacing many of our day-to-day tasks, even in medicine. However, being an effective communicator and a supportive and enthusiastic team player is essential in today's technology-driven world. As the leader of your clinic it's imperative for you to eagerly participate and comingle with colleagues at every level of the organization. / ©Konstantin_Chagin/Shutterstock.com
  • 5. Inject a little humor.
    5. Inject a little humor. Medicine is serious business. Still, a little levity can go a long way toward enhancing relationships by reducing stress and replacing pressure with pleasure. Choose to have a positive attitude in spite of the physical and emotional trauma that often accompanies the medical profession. You don't have to become a jester, but cracking a joke (or even a smile) can break building tension. Just be sure you've chosen a suitable topic and the appropriate time. / ©Instudio 68/Shutterstock.com
  • 6. Know when to bite your tongue.
    6. Know when to bite your tongue. Verbal one-upmanship gets tedious, especially when it's between colleagues. Healthcare can be notorious for competitive, rather than collaborative, conversations. Although comparing stories often results in learning, if you always feel tempted to outdo others, take a talk break and focus on listening. People will become more interested in you when you show sincere interest in them. / ©Stock Life/Shutterstock.com
  • 7. Generate pre-conference connections.
    7. Generate pre-conference connections. Socializing is no longer limited to face-to-face conversations. Nowadays it's a given that conference attendees will begin networking with one another via social media in advance of the event. Meeting planners are heeding their clients' calls to connect by including social media hubs as part of convention websites. Reaching out to others before a medical conference or professional assembly will ease the stress of bonding with people once you arrive. / ©Andrey_Popov/Shutterstock.com
  • Initiating and developing professional relationships has never been easier.
    Initiating and developing professional relationships has never been easier. When you've met someone you'd like to collaborate with—either online or in person—you can instantly add them to your network. What matters the most from that point is to honor your commitments to stay in touch. The effort you put toward strengthening your social skills will continually make it easier for you to connect. / ©Blend Images/Shutterstock.com

Patients and colleagues benefit from a physician's ability to communicate with confidence. Mastering such skills leads to increased career satisfaction.

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Source: 
Physicians Practice

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