ubmslate-logo-ubm

P2 Mobile Logo

Search form

Topics:

10 Revealing Quotes on Physician Burnout

10 Revealing Quotes on Physician Burnout

Physicians are trained to be autonomous problem solvers. But that ability to function independently can be a downfall when it comes to dealing with workplace stress. Government mandates, awkward EHR technology, and quality reporting requirements are just making it harder to do what physicians do best: treat patients.

Most likely you have your own opinions about the stresses and challenges of being a physician. Don't be shy, tell us what you think in the comment section below. In the meantime, here's what our experts in the field have to say.

To download a PDF of this slideshow, click here.

Source: 
Physicians Practice

Comments

Medicine began as an art. We had limited diagnostic and therapeutic tools. An orange was an orange because it looked and tasted like an orange.
Then Medicine became a science. The PDR grew; we had multiple sophisticated diagnostic tools, epidemiology studies, and effective therapy. An orange was an orange because the DNA sequence of the hairpin loop of the polyribosome was ACTG. This transition we all applaud!
Now medicine is a business. An orange is an orange because I can do 47 tests and charge $607.35 to prove it is an orange: but I have to constantly reassure my patients and myself that we are more important than the computer. THe humanism in Medicine is gone and with it the satisfaction. No wonder we "burn out"! Nothing to balance the stress!!

stanley @

Medical care is not a proper function of government.

I think the legislative, executive and judicial branches should have to code everything they do. There should be a limited allowance for their "vacations." A citizen corps of checkers and monitors should shadow them daily. Also, no pay when they are absent from the job, and when they miss votes.

Government needs to be much smaller, so that they cannot hand out favors. The level of corruption in the USA is horrifying.

Time for the Docs to check out. Hey Hillary, you're being paged to the ER! There's a guy down here with DKA you need to see. And you, Obama, looks like an acute CVA in room 2.

Tamzin @

So much paperwork for no good reason!! School have BMI, height and weight and the school lunches have poor food with "good choices". That is a laugh since most children would not pick salad over pizza. LOL!! And requests for prescriptions for occupational therapy and physical therapy......If the school states the patient needs it after evaluation, why does the physician have to sign a script. The patient doesn't want to even come to the physician after the school states they already need the therapy, and we just waste our time with paper pushing. And this ridiculous taking back payments from insurance companies. They decide, sometimes several months later, that they made a mistake and the patient was not eligible and they are already to take back money from future payments. Why are we spending time and money having staff check eligibility on their complex web sites when they can turn around and say "too bad, our website was not up to date" That should be ILLEGAL!!

Anonymous @

If you put anyone in a profession with high levels of responsibility and stress, erratic sleep patterns, decreasing appreciation and validation, high overhead and expense and then put random amounts of money in their bank account from time to time, most people will quit and move on. Doctors tend to stick it out, after all, what else are we trained to do? No wonder we have personal lives that fall apart and we turn to destructive behaviour to escape from all this stress. Something needs to change otherwise the profession that we hold in such high regard will be populated by doctors that are broken or those that don't care. Either way, it's bad news for our patients.

David @

Can we send this to Medicare and all the insurance companies, The Senate and House representatives and our president. It took me 20 years to get control of my burnout in then reduce my practice to 250 patients with MDVIP program. I now have a great life and practice.

Brenda @

I fight burnout by racing cars and chasing women. When I am going wheel to wheel w someone, I can't think of anything else. Adrenaline surge and complete escape. Yes, I have been in two wrecks, but that's another story.

David @

I'm getting burned out on leaving comments on these websites because it accomplishes nothing concrete except it allows me to vent a little.

k @

These comments are a sad commentary on the current state of medicine. Physicians are trained to be autonomous, are highly educated, and for the most part are very well trained. Then they go out into practice, and are subject to the nanny state, where regulations and unceasing directives that have nothing to with delivering quality medical care (except in government bureaucrat minds) are imposed. This creates an impossible situation for physicians to perform under. The situation is getting worse. Even physicians trained under the "new paradigm" are having trouble dealing with it, because the core mission of caring for patients is co-oped by doing what the bureaucracy wants. These are mutually exclusive. One example. Patient's crave more time with their physicians. Physicians are forced to see more patients in order to be more "efficient". Physicians have to document things in an EHR or have a scribe do so. That completely stilts the time and what is said in the physician patient relationship. This type of medicine is less personal, and less directed toward what patient's want, and more directed to what the payer wants. These are not common goals. Has anyone ever asked patients if they are thrilled about EHR's, because directly or indirectly they are paying for them. Has a life every been saved by an EHR? Where are the double blinded studies to prove that? Burnout is going to continue to accelerate. The system will eventually deal with this as the word gets out and the best and brightest no longer will go into medicine. The result will eventually be the selection of a new generation of physicians who are indifferent to patient concerns but who will not experience burnout since they will be happy to comply with "directives".

LEE @

Long hours, vague patients, Sounds like my family doctor in the 60's who made house calls, had his office in his home in a converted lower level and garage area . And would see a patient at a variety of after hours even weekends-- . Yes there is also a push for cost effectiveness but most all times it is based on empirical data--doctor is free to use his judgment if the first concern is the patient and not compensation and the reason for his choice is grounded in science, then it will get paid. Or sometimes there is today a better way that maybe is new (to that physician).

Stephen @

Long hours, vague patients, Sounds like my family doctor in the 60's who made house calls, had his office in his home in a converted lower level and garage area . And would see a patient at a variety of after hours even weekends-- . Yes there is also a push for cost effectiveness but most all times it is based on empirical data--doctor is free to use his judgment if the first concern is the patient and not compensation and the reason for his choice is grounded in science, then it will get paid. Or sometimes there is today a better way that maybe is new (to that physician).

Stephen @

Add new comment

 
Loading comments...

By clicking Accept, you agree to become a member of the UBM Medica Community.