Why Primary Care is a Good Second Career

December 19, 2017

In the last of a three-part interview series, the Dean of the Frank H. Netter M.D. School of Medicine talks about primary care being a second career option.

This is part 3 of a 3-part video series interviewing Bruce Koeppen, MD, the founding Dean of Quinnipiac University's Frank H. Netter M.D. School of Medicine.

Part 1 of the video can be found here.

Part 2 of the video can be found here.

For those looking to enter medicine in their second career, being a primary-care physician is an attractive option, says Bruce Koeppen, MD, Dean of the Frank H. Netter M.D. School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University in North Haven, Ct.

This is because the length of training is not as long as other specialties. After medical school, residency for primary-care physicians is three years in length. "They want to get out and practice as soon as possible," Koeppen says. "In addition, they also are coming to medicine because they want to help people and they feel the best way to do that is in a primary care setting."

Earlier in the video, Koeppen talks about the efforts the Frank H. Netter M.D. School of Medicine takes into giving their students, considering it doesn't operate a clinical facility. He says the school has partnerships with more than 200 primary-care physicians and hospitals - both in and out of Connecticut.

"I believe having those kinds of resources available to our students is a bonus because it allows them to see how medicine is practiced in multiple institutions. It will help them make career decisions fits best with where they want to practice medicine," he says.

To close out the video interview series, Koeppen discusses future plans for the Netter Medical School and attracting a new generation of primary-care physicians

Video Edited by Ben Richey