Things Physicians Want to Tell Their Families and Politicians

October 12, 2011

When it comes to their careers and the future of their profession, physicians have a lot to say. Here's a sampling of such comments, directed at their families and our nation's political leaders.

When it comes to their careers and the future of their profession, physicians have a lot to say. Here's a sampling of such comments, directed at their families and our nation's political leaders, culled from our 2011 Great American Physician Survey.

5 Things Physicians Want to Tell Politicians

1. "Physicians are well-educated, committed to good patient care, and do not need government interference."

2. "Doctors are not pawns in your frequent budget games."

3. "Why don't you get out of the way? It is already difficult to take care of patients and you routinely make it more difficult by interfering in the most cost-effective medical intervention - the doctor-patient relationship."

4. "'Take Your Politician to Work Day' could open our representatives' eyes and minds about what it takes to operate a medical practice."

5. "We need to provide healthcare for all citizens, not just the rich and employed."

5 Things Physicians Want to Tell Their Own Kids

1. "Pay is decreasing, respect for the field is decreasing, and hassles are increasing."

2. "Being a doctor is very hard, so don't think about being a physician if you don't want to work hard. You should be ready to work day and night, weekends, and holidays."

3. "Expect to make a living giving to people. Some will be grateful, others will respond with an attitude of entitlement. Do your best in all cases and leave the results in the hands of God. Don't let others' comments affect you."

4. "I wish you knew how hard I worked to be a doctor and to work in this environment of unscrupulous lawyers and people who want to make a quick buck."

5. "Do not do primary care."

5 Things Physicians Want to Tell Their Spouses

1. "I'm sorry about what I lost getting here, but what is left of me is forever yours."

2. "Being a doctor's spouse involves adjustment of expectations."

3. "At some point, we should retire and move south and enjoy life."

4. "Thanks for allow[ing] me to sacrifice our time for the benefit of my patients."

5. "Honey, please buy more Lotto tickets so we can get out of this business."

Marisa Torrieri and Aubrey Westgate are associate editors at Physicians Practice. They can be reached at marisa.torrieri@ubm.com or Aubrey.westgate@ub.com.

This article originally appeared in the October 2011 issue of Physicians Practice.